“What I wish I knew” – Sherrina Lofton

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As a former Division 1 student athlete, I had trouble with identifying my next steps, so I understand how challenging that time and process can be. Before starting my graduate career, I had not really given much thought to pursuing a master’s degree, let alone a doctorate. I wish I had known that it was ok to take the necessary time to fully research and understand all of the PhD programs that were available to me. I did some research based on my understanding as a career counselor, but it wasn’t until a year or two into my PhD that I realized the program I had entered into, was not the right fit for me. Had my pre-doctoral research been more thorough, I would have started in my current program (Educational Leadership and Policy Studies.) Although this little detour has extended my time to completion, I learned a lot through the process and am happy for the experience and knowledge I have gained thus far in pursuing my doctorate.

As my research centers around identifying ways to best assist collegiate student athletes in their transition out of college sports; now that I have gone through this process myself, I know better how to guide other students, especially student athletes, through the process of pursing an advanced degree. I think my matriculation experience adds some fruitful wisdom to share with others like myself who are first generation African American undergraduate or graduate students.

My Mantra: “Life is a journey filled with lessons and blessings.”

Sherrina Lofton, PhD Candidate

Florida State University

Higher Education: Educational Leadership and Policy Studies

“What I Wish I knew” – Symone Alexander

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As a chemical engineer and polymer scientist, I was blessed to have an amazing graduate advisor who is also a black woman and has been extremely successful in her career. However, I was always afraid I would mess up or disappoint everyone who believed in me. I wish I knew that it was okay to not have all the answers and to be vulnerable with trusted mentors. Chances are they have had similar experiences and can offer great advice on how to move forward.

I also wish I knew that it is okay to say “no” or “not right now” to extra responsibility. As black women in the academy, we are often called upon to do more because we represent gender and racial minority groups.  Looking back, saying no to unnecessary responsibility would have allowed me to put more energy into causes I am passionate about, and would have prevented some of the “burn outs” I experienced.

We have made so much progress and are knocking down racial, gender, and class barriers left and right! I’m so proud of and encouraged by all the brilliant black women I encounter in communities like Black Girls Guide to Grad School. I have hope that if we continue to connect with and support one another, there’s nothing we can’t do!

My Mantra: “Life shrinks or expands in proportion to one’s courage.” – Anaïs Nin

Symone Alexander, PhD Candidate
NSF Graduate Research Fellow

Readjusting Goals despite Setbacks and Distractions

 

There are instances when we have well-planned goals with what seem like a full proof plan to execute them, yet still unexpected setbacks or distractions disrupt the execution of these goals. Setbacks are different from blockers. Blockers are situations that you must overcome or individuals you must work with to get to your goal. It is almost safe to say that you see blockers in your goal plan when you are laying out your pathway. A setback is an event that occurs unexpectedly. There is no plan for it but there is re-adjustment. It is important to readjust on a holistic level to see all the goals and how they may be affected. While one goal may experience a setback, another goal might also be affected by this and as a result a bird’s eye view is necessary. Therefore, take a step and do some light re-planning. Identify what goals need to be shifted or added and what pathways need to be updated.

Readjusting may require setting new goals with possible scaling especially if time is a factor. If time is a factor, one question that can be asked is, ‘What is the Minimum Valuable Product that can be produced from this goal?’ In other words, if planned to save $50 for a trip but only really need $30 for the ticket and $10 for local transport, it means that your minimum achievable goal (MAG) is $40. You should only think about reaching your MAG when there is belief that you are too constrained to achieve the goal you set. It should not be common practice, but this relieves unnecessary pressure and the feeling of being overwhelmed.

Remember this process of goal planning and execution is iterative, and keeping an open mind for adjustments and re-planning is important.

This concludes our 2018 January Series on ‘Goals’. Remember what the weekly highlights in January were:

  • Successful Goal Setting
  • Strategies for Executing Goals
  • Identifying blockers and working around them
  • Readjusting Goals despite Setbacks and Distractions

“See” you in February! Thank you for your views 🙂

Successful Goal Setting

So at the end of every semester, we all say, “I need to set my goals for the new semester”. But how do we determine our goals for the semester? What is the strategy? Here are a few tips to helping you set your goals successfully. First, determine what major milestones are going to happen during the upcoming semester. For example, maybe there is the qualifying exam or a proposal due. These are major events that cannot be changed or shifted, therefore you need to set goals to help prepare you for these major events. The goals you set should be focused, achievable and realistic. It should also relate to the bigger picture. What do we mean by the bigger picture? Think of your semester and the things you would like to achieve holistically. In other words, use a systems thinking approach to goal setting. Using a systems thinking mindset allows you to look at your semester wholly and recognize what aspects of the semester depend on each other. It also leads to creativity as you are better able to think outside of the box when you have all the pieces in play.

Once you have the holistic view, you can determine what direction needs to be taken and set specific goals to take you there. The goals should be focused and the outcomes should be clear. The focused goals should also be achievable and realistic. If there is an obvious impediment that is going to prevent you from achieving that goal then the goal is not achievable. Hopes and maybes should never be included in the goals you set. For example: “This semester I will be published in a journal” vs “This semester I will submit to a journal”. The first goal is uncertain because being published depends on reviewer approval but the second goal depends mostly on you and therefore you can take steps (we will talk about strategies for execution next week) to achieve that goal. Although the both goals begin with “This semester”, making them are technically time boxed, drilling down to a more specific date (month) helps set a cadence: “I will submit to a journal by April of this semester”.

Now it’s time to visualize! The best way to visualize your goals is to write them down in a place you will be seeing them regularly as a constant reminder. First we see then we DO. This means that your last goal you should add to your list is “STICK TO GOALS!” The only way to meet a goal successfully is by being consistent.

Next week’s topic will focus on strategies for goal execution and will help with consistency.