Readjusting Goals despite Setbacks and Distractions

 

There are instances when we have well-planned goals with what seem like a full proof plan to execute them, yet still unexpected setbacks or distractions disrupt the execution of these goals. Setbacks are different from blockers. Blockers are situations that you must overcome or individuals you must work with to get to your goal. It is almost safe to say that you see blockers in your goal plan when you are laying out your pathway. A setback is an event that occurs unexpectedly. There is no plan for it but there is re-adjustment. It is important to readjust on a holistic level to see all the goals and how they may be affected. While one goal may experience a setback, another goal might also be affected by this and as a result a bird’s eye view is necessary. Therefore, take a step and do some light re-planning. Identify what goals need to be shifted or added and what pathways need to be updated.

Readjusting may require setting new goals with possible scaling especially if time is a factor. If time is a factor, one question that can be asked is, ‘What is the Minimum Valuable Product that can be produced from this goal?’ In other words, if planned to save $50 for a trip but only really need $30 for the ticket and $10 for local transport, it means that your minimum achievable goal (MAG) is $40. You should only think about reaching your MAG when there is belief that you are too constrained to achieve the goal you set. It should not be common practice, but this relieves unnecessary pressure and the feeling of being overwhelmed.

Remember this process of goal planning and execution is iterative, and keeping an open mind for adjustments and re-planning is important.

This concludes our 2018 January Series on ‘Goals’. Remember what the weekly highlights in January were:

  • Successful Goal Setting
  • Strategies for Executing Goals
  • Identifying blockers and working around them
  • Readjusting Goals despite Setbacks and Distractions

“See” you in February! Thank you for your views 🙂

Strategies for Executing Your Goals

Now that we have taken the time to think about the goals we plan to accomplish for the semester, how do we lay them out strategically to ensure they are successfully executed? The most important thing is laying out the path and steps needed to achieve each goal. Look at each goal and determine what needs to be done to get to the end point. This gives a comprehensive view of how tasks for each goal are going to be executed. This method also allows you to see what steps have dependencies and may require sub-tasks or sub-goals in order to move forward. Because your goals are time-boxed or have an achievement date, the outlined steps for each goal should also fall within the timeline, allotting enough time to get each task done. This is where those time management strategies come in to play (visit the post on ‘5 Tips for Time Management’). This may seem like a rigid method, but it still allows for some fluidity as tasks can be moved around; as long as there is an initial plan.

The approach is ideal in also helping to identify any goal blockers you may have. Goal blockers are situations or dependencies that you cannot work around in order to get closer to your goal. In other words, you have to get through that blocker to move ahead. This can be difficult sometimes, especially when it comes to depending on something or someone else to make it happen. But in laying out the plan, you can easily identify these blockers and therefore account for them when you are doing your steps. You may have to come up with an alternate step or allot more time for that particular task or even plan in a way where you can get started on another goal while you wait. Whatever you do, stand firm and do not remove any of your end goals from the plan until absolutely necessary. Readjusting the goals you have that are difficult to accomplish is a whole different ball game that we will touch on next week. Sometimes you have no choice but to alter the goal but when is the right time to do that? Stay tuned to find out.

5 Tips for Time Management

One of my biggest challenge has always been managing my time well. I enjoying adding to my plate and volunteering for tasks till I realize that my plate is overflowing and everything is due at the same time. This leads to a stressful dash to get things completed with all-nighters and no sleep. Busy time comes in ebbs and flows, so how do we find a way to find that balance and manage while not feeling overwhelmed with deadlines looming over us? It’s all about planning, prioritizing and managing our time.

Step 1)

Begin with a high level view of everything you have upcoming. From exams to deliverables. What are the milestones and deadlines? Laying out tasks visually allow you to see not just when tasks are due but the time you have between them so you can better plan. If you put something on your radar for 5 weeks out, then you can start working backward on the steps you will have to take to achieve that task. How you visually lay it out is personal preference but I have found printing monthly calendars then taping them to my desk have worked great for me. If you are on the organized side then a planner will also work as an added plus. But the key to having a high level view is to ensure that a constant optical is maintained. A planner is always put away and unless it is opened and flipped through, you are not going to have that constant view. Having a printed view in places that you tend to be (office, bedroom), will give you a constant reminder.

Step 2)

Now that you have laid out the tasks, milestones and deadlines you need to track and create a short road-map for each of them. This is a hybrid road-map that can show you the steps you need to take to get an end goal accomplished. From researching, to writing a paper, to submittal, it is important to list the steps you need to take. From this list, you can then work your way backward from the end task to see when the steps need to be completed. This way, they are strategically placed on the calendar.  It will take some practice to arrive at the optimal road-map but this is a great start when it comes to time management.

Step 3)

Once you have worked your way backward, you are probably going to end up with multiple steps to do for different tasks on the same day or within days of each other. This is where you prioritize and plan, try to avoid placing heavy to-do’s on the same day. It is important to set feasible goals. If stuck to accomplish those tasks within the same sitting or week, then that means Step 2) is not yet optimum. But that is okay! This is where some prioritizing and mini-planning comes into play. Break up the bigger list items into smaller items. This ensures you are not too overwhelmed and trying to do one multi-hour item in one sitting. Which leads me to the next step. (Tip: Try not to have more than two big tasks in one planned sitting/day)

Step 4)

So you have highlighted everything you have to achieve on your visual calendar or board, made your hybrid roadmap/list of steps in getting there and strategically placed these steps on your visual to create a timeline, now, time-blocking. There is no point in doing all this pre-planning if you are still going try to jam everything in at once. This is where prioritizing from step 3) and having dedicated time blocks go hand in hand. When there are multiple steps to be completed in your queue, you can’t afford to only spend time on one thing that only serves a single end goal. It helps to come up with a plan where there is dedicated time spent on each. Just like studying, it is important to break up heavy to-do’s into shorter sittings. Of course some items will take longer to complete than others but this is where your priority and goal placement on the calendar come into play.

Step 5)

Be consistent and dedicated to your plan. The only way to improve time management is to be consistent with your planned flow. There will always be unexpected occurrences but with great structure, you can handle it. As you continue to manage month by month, you will find your rhythm and your style, what works for you and what doesn’t.

What other time management tools work for you?

Feel free to contact or comment for more discussion and tips!